logo

Merging of 2 Black Holes Wreaking Havoc in the Universe 100,000 Years From Now

Once upon a time, two enormous black holes stumbled on each other, and got trapped in an extremely complicated relationship that might ultimately have huge repercussions on space-time itself. These astonishing estimations are part and parcel of a new study published in the journal Nature this week.

black holes

The two huge black holes, located in a distant galaxy, are expected to collide and merge soon enough – an impact that is estimated to cause space-time to be distorted in the future. This event is expected to happen around 100,000 years from now – a time period that sounds very, very far away, but which is not that distant when considered on a cosmic scale.

The system of black holes are called PG 1302-102. It is 3.5 billion light years away – a safe distance from us. It is situated in the Virgo constellation. The two are separated by only a light-week – this is the tightest orbiting pair ever identified.

“This is the closest we’ve come to observing two black holes on their way to a massive collision,” the study’s senior author, Zoltan Haiman, an astronomer at Columbia University, said in a statement on EurekaAlert.

“Watching this process reach its culmination can tell us whether black holes and galaxies grow at the same rate, and ultimately test a fundamental property of space-time — its ability to carry vibrations called gravitational waves, produced in the last, most violent, stage of the merger,” explained Haiman.

Black holes are often described as huge sucking voids that have the potential of causing great disturbance and distorting laws of physics as we know it. The new discovery seems to highlight this characteristic further. Furthermore, on top of providing further insight on how galaxies merge, it might also shed light on gravitational waves that have not been observed as yet.

Gravitational waves are theorised to be responsible for the transport of energy as gravitational radiation. If they are ever observed, our understanding of the theory of relativity would be broadened considerably.

“Watching this process reach its culmination can tell us whether black holes and galaxies grow at the same rate, and ultimately test a fundamental property of space-time — its ability to carry vibrations called gravitational waves, produced in the last, most violent, stage of the merger,” Haiman added.

Google+

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share this article.

Share this post with your family and friends by clicking one of the social network buttons below to help us spread the word. Thank you.