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Month: November 2015

Envy Motivates Facebook Users To Create Unrealistic Posts to Compete With Friends

Envy is an important motivating factor for Facebook posts, says a new study conducted by researchers from Sauder School of Business. The emotion would also be a cause of decreased mental well-being. The findings are published in Information Systems Research. The concept of social online networks being a double-edged sword has been brought up yet

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Teaching Is Not The Only Mechanism For Humans’ Cultural Progress

Researchers from the University of Exeter have recently challenged the important position of teaching in the history of humans: their findings indicate that the making of improved tools over time does not depend entirely on teaching. Rather, while having a teacher is useful, it is not a limiting factor to cultural progress, because humans can

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Scientists Create Lightest Form of Gold Made of 98 % of Air

Scientists from Switzerland have created the lightest form of gold which consists of 98 % of air, and 20-carat gold, as well as milk protein fibres. The findings are available in the journal Advanced Materials. Researcher Raffaele Mezzenga from ETH Zurich and his team created the new type of gold from a 3D meshwork made

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Humans Talk & Sing Just Like Birds!

The same physical mechanism is behind the songs of birds and the words of humans, says a new study published in the journal Nature Communications. The sound of human speech might seem very different from birds singing, but, the similarities that exist far beyond our eyes are stark. While humans produce sounds via the larynx,

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Hope For Type I Diabetics: Scientists Successfully Restore Insulin Production

Scientists from the University of California have come forth with a groundbreaking research that could enhance the quality of life of Type I diabetics who otherwise need daily injections of insulin: they succeeded in boosting the immune system thereby restoring the production of the hormone in the body. The paper is published in the journal

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Dispersal of humans 100,000 Years Ago Triggered By Betrayal and Trust

How did our species spread across the world? University of York archaeologist Penny Spikins believes that the process accelerated 100,000 years ago because of betrayals of trust. The new paper is published in Open Quarternary. The dispersal of humans transitioned from a slow pace to a fast one 100,000 years ago. Prior to the change,

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Ants Body Bridge: Army Ants Collectively Use Their Bodies As Bridges To Create Shortcuts In Forests

Why build bridges from available materials when you yourself can become the bridges? An international team of scientists have recently observed that army ants can not only use each other’s bodies as bridges when the need arises to create shortcuts in dangerous parts of rainforests but they can also modify the position of the living

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Healthy Breakfast Linked With Better Grades

We are always hearing of the benefits of a healthy breakfast, and how the lack of it can have adverse effects. A new study, published in Public Health Nutrition, has recently considered its effects on school performance. Analysing eating habits of 5,000 children Researchers from Cardiff University, UK, conducted a study involving over 5,000 children

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New Insight In Fat Cell Metabolism Could Boost Treatment For Diabetes & Obesity

A new study conducted by scientists from the University of California provides new insight into fat cell metabolism. The findings might help to understand certain conditions relating to diabetics and obese patients. The paper is published in the Nature Chemical Biology. The results of the new study are relevant to fat cell metabolism pertaining to the

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First Known Use of Beeswax: In 7000 BCE In Anatolia

A new study has provided new information pertaining to how human interest in bees and their products might have originated. An international team of researchers examined 6,400 ceramic containers (from the oldest pottery cultures) that existed back in the Neolithic period from regions of Near East (Western Asia), Europe and North Africa that make up

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Natural Compass in Many Animals Is Due To A Nano-Scale Protein

A new study suggests that some animals can detect the magnetic field of the Earth thanks to aggregates of proteins that prompt their nervous system allowing them to have a sense of direction. The paper is published in Nature Materials. Aimed at finding the mechanism that governs the ability of some animals to navigate themselves,

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Vampire Bats Share Blood With Mates To Obtain Help During Times of Starvation

Scratch my back, and I’ll scratch yours ― vampire bats have their own version of the saying. A new study published in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B indicates that the creatures feed others of their kind with blood so that the latter return the favour during times of need. Vampire bats normally feed on

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