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Month: May 2016

Let Babies Cry Themselves For Better Sleep – New Study Confirms

A new study suggests that letting a baby cry himself to sleep might be beneficial for both him and his parents. The paper is published in the journal Pediatrics. Should parents let their babies cry themselves to sleep or should they attempt to calm them? This is definitely one of the hottest debates that has

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Helping Old Brains Connect Related Memories

Probing into the brains of mice, scientists have found the pathway through which memories are linked over time; this has allowed the team to reconnect separate memories in older brains. The paper is published in the journal Nature. One of the greatest problems that comes with age involves memory. The human is but at the

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‘Animal Avengers’ Make 3D-Printed Shell For Tortoise Freddy

A tortoise whose shell was damaged from burns has been saved thanks to a 3D-printed shell made by a group called Animal Avengers. The tortoise, named Freddy, was found on a roadside in Brazil last year – it had been in a fire earlier that had damaged its shell up to 85%. The group of people

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Enormous Hole in the Sun! Should We Get Worried?!

An enormous ‘hole’ has occurred in our Sun, says NASA. The size of the said hole is thought to be over 10% of the surface area of the Sun. What does this mean? Is our Sun disintegrating?! The picture depicting a huge dark area on the upper half of the Sun was released by NASA

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Biodegradable Plastics Are Not So Biodegradable, Says UN Report

Biodegradable plastics are not as green as they were previously thought to be, according to a report of the United Nations, entitled “MARINE PLASTIC DEBRIS AND MICROPLASTICS”. The new report of the UN says that the rate at which biodegradable plastics break down is extremely slow. Some of them need very high temperatures to actually

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Air Pollution Linked With Weight Gain and Insulin Resistance

Air pollution is linked to weight gain, obesity and insulin resistance. Thanks to a new study, we now have yet another reason to hate it. The paper is published in FASEB Journal. Though air pollution has pervaded almost all of our planet, Beijing, the capital of China, remains the most affected one by far. According

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Bloodstream Infections, A Growing Challenge

The resilience of pathogens that result in bloodstream infections is discussed in an article published in a special issue of Virulence. The human fight happening at the microscopic and molecular level remains a staunch one – the human body is constantly combating pathogen attack, among which feature bloodstream infections (BSI) which are considered to be resilient.

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Spanking Children Linked With Mental Health Problems in Adulthood

Spanking is linked with increased risks of developing anti-social behaviour, mental health problems, aggression, and disrupted cognition, says a new study published in the Journal of Family Psychology. A meta-analysis of studies spanning over 5 decades has been conducted by researchers from the University of Texas and the University of Michigan to evaluate the effects of

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Why Men Have Shorter Lives Than Women: Blame the Loss of Y Chromosome

Why do men live relatively shorter lives than women? This question might be partly answered by new findings recently published in the American Journal of Human Genetics: the loss of Y chromosome in blood cells of some men might be linked with Alzheimer’s disease. To test their hypothesis of whether loss of Y chromosome in

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Smoking During Pregnancy Linked With Risk of Schizophrenia in Foetus

A new study emphasises the great danger of smoking: it suggests that smoking in pregnant women is linked with higher risks of schizophrenia in their children. The paper is published in the American Journal of Psychiatry. The overall health of the pregnant mother is linked with that of her child. Science has proved how adhering

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Two New Lunar Craters Discovered

Two new craters have been spotted on the darkest regions of the Moon! The paper documenting the findings is published in the journal Icarus. The study was conducted by researchers from Southwest Research Institute. The two craters are geologically young ones: the first one is about 16 million years old, while the other one’s age is

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Diversity in Nose Shape Defined By 5 Genes Only

The shape of your nose is dictated by 5 genes specifically, says a new study published in the journal Nature Communications. Societies are so focused on physical appearance, and other traits that are generally apparent to others, that they tend to restrict the definition of beauty and “what is acceptable”, while the truth is the

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